• Users Online: 532
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 5  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 130-136

Comparison between final-year medical students' career choices before and after the conduction of a mentorship activity


1 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Department of Forensic Medicine and Clinical Toxicology, College of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Samah Fathy Ibrahim
Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, Princess Nourah Bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jnsm.jnsm_83_21

Rights and Permissions

Background: The elective specialty's selection significantly impacts the graduates' acceptance rate in a preferable postgraduate specialty training program. This selection has a multifactorial nature of the decision-making process that worries the undergraduate students and alters their academic lives. Objective: This study aimed to assess final-year undergraduate medical students' specialty choices before and after the conduction of a mentorship activity. Methods: The mentorship activity was organized in the academic year 2019–2020 to help the 71 final-year medical students choose their preferred future specialty. Two self-reported pre- and postactivity surveys, including demographics, the chosen specialty, location, factors that influenced their top-ranked choices, needs/feedback about the activity, were used. Results: Sixty-six female students, with a mean age of 23.5 ± 0.8 years, participated in mentoring activity, with a response rate of 92.95%. Most of the participants (73%) decided to be trained in one local residency training program. Surgery (31.8%) and family medicine (28.8%) were the most popular specialties. Personal interest (88%) was endorsed as the most influential factor influencing their choices. The internship mentoring activity significantly increased participants' ability to choose the elective training specialty (P < 0.012) but did not substantially affect the future training selected places (P < 0.6).Conclusion: Professional medical training has various challenges at serial phases, and university mentoring activities should be tailored to meet students' desires and the need of the professional society.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed390    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded32    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal