• Users Online: 243
  • Print this page
  • Email this page


 
 
Table of Contents
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 333-336

Perception of first-year medical students of virtual video demonstration of the objective structured clinical examination at king saud university medical college in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic


1 Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Date of Submission30-Dec-2020
Date of Decision09-Mar-2021
Date of Acceptance16-Apr-2021
Date of Web Publication06-Oct-2021

Correspondence Address:
Mona M Soliman
Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jnsm.jnsm_175_20

Rights and Permissions
  Abstract 


Background: The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) has challenged and disrupted medical education worldwide. Objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) is one of the types of assessment for undergraduate medical students that has been conducted for first-year medical students in the College of Medicine. Peer student training on participating in OSCE has been conducted prior to the pandemic. The aim of this study was to assess medical students' perception of online virtual peer student video training on participating in the OSCE. Methods: Medical student's council team prepared a video demonstration on the steps of participating in OSCE. In October 2020, the video was provided online for first-year medical students (n = 302) prior to their OSCE. After the completion of the OSCE exam, a 10 – item questionnaire was distributed on the students' perception on the impact of the peer student video demonstration on students' orientation about the OSCE. The questionnaire was sent by Google Forms. The results were expressed as a percentage on a Likert scale. Results: About 74.17% (n = 224) of students responded to the online questionnaire. More than half of the students (n = 126, 56%) found the steps of conduction of the OSCE well explained, provided the sufficient orientation (n = 121, 54%), and found the video stimulating (n = 122, 54%). In addition, the majority of students (n = 160, 71%) learned and understood the steps of the OSCE and 152 students (68%) found that the video helped introducing them to the concept of OSCE. Almost half the students found that the video helped lowering the stress level before the OSCE (n = 91, 41%), eased the steps of the OSCE (n = 113, 50%), and found that the materials were well prepared and explained (n = 126, 56%). Conclusions: The virtual video demonstration of the OSCE during the COVID-19 pandemic had an overall positive perception from first-year medical students. However, peer student's orientation on the OSCE will continue after the pandemic. Further supports for first-year medical students are needed during the pandemic.

Keywords: COVID-19, medical students, stress


How to cite this article:
Soliman MM, AlGhamdi MA, Shadid AM, Alsaif FF, Alkuwaiz LA, Alaql MS, Khdary MN, Basfar AA, Alsohime F, Aldhahri S, Neel KF. Perception of first-year medical students of virtual video demonstration of the objective structured clinical examination at king saud university medical college in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic. J Nat Sci Med 2021;4:333-6

How to cite this URL:
Soliman MM, AlGhamdi MA, Shadid AM, Alsaif FF, Alkuwaiz LA, Alaql MS, Khdary MN, Basfar AA, Alsohime F, Aldhahri S, Neel KF. Perception of first-year medical students of virtual video demonstration of the objective structured clinical examination at king saud university medical college in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic. J Nat Sci Med [serial online] 2021 [cited 2021 Dec 1];4:333-6. Available from: https://www.jnsmonline.org/text.asp?2021/4/4/333/327596




  Introduction Top


The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic on March 2020 by the World Health Organization.[1] There was a sudden shift to online education in all universities including medical colleges. Medical education has been challenged worldwide to provide alternative modalities of teaching and learning to ensure the quality of education and maintain the safety of students and faculty applying strict precautionary measures and social distancing. This massive transition to online education required the development of innovative methods to enhance students' learning.[2],[3]

The undergraduate medical curriculum at King Saud University is a 5-year hybrid curriculum that includes early exposure of medical students to the clinical encounter from year 1. Clinical skills of history taking clinical examination are taught within the block course in a system-oriented manner. There are nine blocks in years 1 and 2. The students are assessed at the end of each course by objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). The OSCE has three stations that aim in addition to examining the master of the skills taught to be introduced to medical students from the first block in year 1 to train students on the concept of clinical examinations from early years.

Peer student teaching is one of the well-known aspects of medical education.[4] Peer student teaching has proven to have several benefits on students' knowledge and clinical skills.[5],[6] Several medical schools have included peer teaching as part of their curriculum.[4] One of the key benefits of peer teaching is to help peers learn, consolidate, and improve their knowledge experience.[7]

The current COVID-19 situation challenged medical universities worldwide and resulted in an unintended pause in medical students' training and education. Therefore, medical colleges are required to provide the needed students' support and to implement new strategies to support the training during the pandemic.

First-year medical students have reported high levels of stress and anxiety[8] and they have reported higher levels of stress compared to other academic fields.[9]

Before the pandemic, the student council at the college of medicine has been conducted a mock OSCE on regular basis prior to the OSCE for training of the new medical students. The mock OSCE has been used to be conducted at the Clinical Skills and Simulation Center (CSSC). The mock OSCE has been prepared, organized, and conducted by the senior medical students under the supervision of the student's council, medical education department, and CSSC.

Due to the pandemic situation, and the shift to online education, limiting the physical presence of medical students at the college campus to the essential matters, the first-year medical student's situation has been extremely challenged.

First-year medical school has been known worldwide to be a challenging year.[9],[10] To help ease the stress of OSCE in the current situation, a virtual video mock OSCE has been prepared by the senior medical students and has been sent to the first-year medical students prior to their OSCE. The present study presents the perception of the first-year medical students of the online virtual mock OSCE.


  Methods Top


Medical student's council team prepared a video demonstration on the steps of participating in OSCE. The video was filmed at King Saud University, College of Medicine West Building in the CSSC, in October 2020. The ethical approval was obtained from the medical education department and from the CSSC, with Ref. No. 21/0680/IRB Approval date was 18/08/2021. Nine students were requested to participate as actors to simulate how students are arranged in a real OSCE setup. One student was filming the process and the rest of the students were asked to simulate the role of students, examiners, and simulated patients. The video was started by filming the entrance to the examination building then emphasizing the importance of social distancing and wearing masks in the waiting area by asking our participants to sit in the waiting area keeping quiet, distancing, and wearing their masks. Following that, the video demonstrated how students are arranged in each track, ensuring that fewer number of participants rotate through the stations once they hear the bill then read the scenario attached on the door before entering the station. After hearing the bill, the students enter the station where they gave their sticker (which had their name and ID) and started the station which included an examiner and simulated patient. After filming, the video has edited the clips to come up with the finalized video which was then sent to Medical Education Department for the final approval. After approval and revision, the video was distributed to all first-year students through Twitter, YouTube, WhatsApp, and E-mail.

An online questionnaire (additional file) was designed. The consent for participation in the study was obtained from year 1 students. The questionnaire consisted of 10 closed ended questions. The questions addressed the content of the virtual mock OSCE, the usefulness, the clarity, and the impact. The questionnaire was designed using 5-point Likert scale. Google Forms was the online platform used to deliver the self-administered survey. The survey was distributed by the students' council to the first-year medical students (n = 302). Survey participation was voluntary.

Statistical analysis

Data collected from the survey were analyzed using Microsoft Excel software version 2016. Data were presented as an average percentage. Answers to questions were displayed as bar charts.


  Results Top


A total of 224 student responses were received (an overall response rate of 74.17%). [Table 1] displays the student's response to the online questionnaire on a 5-point Likert scale with as of 5: Strongly agree, 4: Agree, 3: Somewhat agree, 2: Slightly agree, and 1: Disagree. As shown, more than half of students (n = 126, 56%) found the steps of conduction of the OSCE well explained and provided the sufficient orientation to the OSCE (n = 121, 54%). In addition, the majority of students (n = 160, 71%) learned and understood the steps of the OSCE and found the video stimulating (n = 122, 54%). One hundred and two students (68%) found that the video helped introducing them to the concept of OSCE. Almost half the students found that the video helped lowering the stress level before the OSCE (n = 91, 41%) and eased the steps of the OSCE (n = 113, 50%). More than half of the students found the materials were well prepared and explained (n = 126, 56%) and eased the steps of the OSCE (n = 113, 50%).
Table 1: First-year medical students' satisfaction of the peer-student virtual orientation on objective structured clinical examination

Click here to view



  Discussion Top


Medical education has been severely challenged during COVID-19 pandemic.[11],[12] At the College of Medicine, King Saud University, several arrangements have been done for the academic year 2020–2021. The strategy for blended learning has been adopted. However, these arrangements with strict social distancing precautions could create a lack of sufficient practical and clinical experience.[13] Therefore, virtual mock OSCE could be an alternative tool to train year 1 medical students and orient them on participating in OSCE in a new and innovative manner of peer student education. The urgent need for training and orientation on OSCE calls for the need for out-of-hospital virtual OSCE training.

Peer student teaching is emerging for teaching and learning and has been proved useful in different medical education fields.[4],[14] Using online virtual platform facilities has been extensively used in medical education during COVID-19 pandemic. The present study evaluated the students' perception of peer student virtual video demonstration on orientation on participating in OSCE for year 1 medical students undergoing OSCE for the first time. The virtual video OSCE demonstration included orientation on the actual steps of a mock OSCE conducted at the same place for the actual OSCE. The virtual mock OSCE was sent to the first-year medical students who do not have any prior experience in participating in OSCE, most participants found the virtual online mock OSCE useful. Participants are highly recommended for future use for the medical students in combination with the actual mock OSCE. The present study showed a positive perception of the peer student training on participation in OSCE for the first time. Due to the current COVID -19 situation and the shift of the teaching to a blended learning strategy, mostly online, the training was provided virtually using online video demonstration.

Peer student teaching has proved to be a positive experience in medical education, especially in developing confidence, knowledge, and clinical skills.[15],[16] However, peer student teaching can be perceived positively or negatively.[10],[17] Stevenson and Sander reported similar results where students dislike the peer student session and they reported that this was because they feel unable to participate.[17] In the present study, the students were satisfied with the experience of the video demonstration. Our findings that the students valued the experience of the virtual peer video demonstration are consistent with previous studies.[5],[10] In a similar study on evaluation of student satisfaction of peer students teaching of history taking from simulated patients, students reported a positive perception of the experience.[10]

However, in the current study, a number of students reported that the video demonstration did not help them to perform excellent results in the OSCE, perhaps related to the level of academic performance of this group. Further, analysis and correlation of the results with the negative perception of the peer virtual video demonstration would be helpful. This negative perception may also be related to the well-known stress and anxiety of first-year medical students.[9],[18] In addition, the shift to online education due to COVID – 19 situation is a major factor in increasing the anxiety and stress among medical students. Previous studies have observed that the amount of stress in medical students was buffered to some extent by joy and self-efficacy.[9] This is absent in the current COVID-19 situation, which is expected to increase the level of anxiety and therefore affect the evaluation of the peer teaching. Although the peer virtual video demonstration of OSCE has been perceived positively, the high level of stress remains a major factor of the evaluation of the students.


  Conclusions Top


The virtual video demonstration of the OSCE during the COVID-19 pandemic had an overall positive perception from first-year medical students. However, peer student's orientation on the OSCE will continue after the pandemic. Further supports for first-year medical students are needed during the pandemic.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Algaissi AA, Alharbi NK, Hassanain M, Hashem AM. Preparedness and response to COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia: Building on MERS experience. J Infect Public Health 2020;13:834-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Fatani TH. Student satisfaction with videoconferencing teaching quality during the COVID-19 pandemic. BMC Med Educ 2020;20:396.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Almarzooq ZI, Lopes M, Kochar A. Virtual learning during the COVID-19 pandemic: A disruptive technology in graduate medical education. J Am Coll Cardiol 2020;75:2635-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Burgess A, McGregor D, Mellis C. Medical students as peer tutors: A systematic review. BMC Med Educ 2014;14:115.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Mills JK, Dalleywater WJ, Tischler V. An assessment of student satisfaction with peer teaching of clinical communication skills. BMC Med Educ 2014;14:217.  Back to cited text no. 5
    
6.
Colaco SM, Chou CL, Hauer KE. Near-peer teaching in a formative clinical skills examination. Med Educ 2006;40:1129-30.  Back to cited text no. 6
    
7.
Tang TS, Hernandez EJ, Adams BS. “Learning by teaching”: A peer-teaching model for diversity training in medical school. Teach Learn Med 2004;16:60-3.  Back to cited text no. 7
    
8.
Moffat KJ, McConnachie A, Ross S, Morrison JM. First year medical student stress and coping in a problem-based learning medical curriculum. Med Educ 2004;38:482-91.  Back to cited text no. 8
    
9.
Heinen I, Bullinger M, Kocalevent RD. Perceived stress in first year medical students-associations with personal resources and emotional distress. BMC Med Educ 2017;17:4.  Back to cited text no. 9
    
10.
Nestel D, Kidd J. Peer tutoring in patient-centred interviewing skills: Experience of a project for first-year students. Med Teach 2003;25:398-403.  Back to cited text no. 10
    
11.
Dedeilia A, Sotiropoulos MG, Hanrahan JG, Janga D, Dedeilias P, Sideris M. Medical and surgical education challenges and innovations in the COVID-19 era: A systematic review. In Vivo 2020;34:1603-11.  Back to cited text no. 11
    
12.
Hall AK, Nousiainen MT, Campisi P, Dagnone JD, Frank JR, Kroeker KI, et al. Training disrupted: Practical tips for supporting competency-based medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic. Med Teach 2020;42:756-61.  Back to cited text no. 12
    
13.
Ferrel MN, Ryan JJ. The impact of COVID-19 on medical education. Cureus 2020;12:e7492.  Back to cited text no. 13
    
14.
Rashid MS, Sobowale O, Gore D. A near-peer teaching program designed, developed and delivered exclusively by recent medical graduates for final year medical students sitting the final objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). BMC Med Educ 2011;11:11.  Back to cited text no. 14
    
15.
Field M, Burke JM, McAllister D, Lloyd DM. Peer-assisted learning: A novel approach to clinical skills learning for medical students. Med Educ 2007;41:411-8.  Back to cited text no. 15
    
16.
Burke J, Fayaz S, Graham K, Matthew R, Field M. Peer-assisted learning in the acquisition of clinical skills: A supplementary approach to musculoskeletal system training. Med Teach 2007;29:577-82.  Back to cited text no. 16
    
17.
Stevenson K, Sander P. Medical students are from mars – business and psychology students are from Venus – University teachers are from Pluto? Med Teach 2002;24:27-31.  Back to cited text no. 17
    
18.
Voltmer E, Kötter T, Spahn C. Perceived medical school stress and the development of behavior and experience patterns in German medical students. Med Teach 2012;34:840-7.  Back to cited text no. 18
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1]



 

Top
 
  Search
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
    Access Statistics
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  

 
  In this article
Abstract
Introduction
Methods
Results
Discussion
Conclusions
References
Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed646    
    Printed16    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded57    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal